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Interview with Laird Scranton, Author of the Velikovsky Heresies - March 2, 2013

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Where Did the Road Go? Show Archive 

Laird Scranton is the author of a trilogy of books about the Dogon tribe in Africa. Laird showcases their extensive scientific knowledge and goes far to show that their knowledge is ancient by connecting it to Egyptian and other civilizations symbolic structures. He shows complex ties to Egypt, as well as India. We discuss all of this in the first half of the show, including;

  • Who were the original researchers of the Dogon?
  • The Dogon Creation Story and it's connections to modern science.
  • The role of Sirius in their mythology.
  • The Nummo Fish.
  • Egyptian connections.
  • The dual meaning of symbols.
  • How they retained the purity of their symbolism.
  • Connections to Quantum, String, and Torsion Theory.
After that, we moved on to Laird's latest book, The Velikovsky Heresies. In this work, Laird compares the theories of Immanual Velikovsky, as presented in Worlds in Collision, published back in 1950 with current science and attempts to find if there is anything we have learned in the last 60 years that definitely proves or disproves Velikovsky's theories. Among other things, we discuss;
  • Velikovsky's theory.
  • The scientific world's reaction.
  • What may have happened to Mars.
  • The change in the length of the year.
  • Characteristics of Venus that still resemble that of comets.
  • Why he was attacked and the lengths his attackers went to.
  • Carl Sagan's role.
You can find Laird's books at Inner Traditions and he has an unofficial website at www.LairdScranton.com
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Wallace Thornhill on The Electric Universe - May 10, 2014

 
 
 
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Where Did the Road Go? Show Archive




Wallace Thornhill joins us on this night, and we discuss many facets of the Electric Universe Theory. Why it should be preferred over the current mainstream model, the proof for it, dismissing the Big Bang, Black Holes, Dark Matter, and much more. We talk of galaxies and stars, and what happened to Mars and Earth in the distant path. We talk of Velikovsky and Peratt. It is a fascinating journey.
 
Wallace Thornhill graduated in Physics at Melbourne University in 1964 and began postgraduate studies with Prof. Victor Hopper’s upper atmosphere research group. Before entering university, he had been inspired by Immanuel Velikovsky through his controversial best-selling book, Worlds in Collision. Wal experienced first-hand the indifference and sometimes hostility toward a radical challenge to mainstream science. He realized there is no career for a heretic in academia.
 
Wal worked for 11 years with IBM Australia. The later years were spent in the prestigious IBM Systems Development Institute in Canberra, working on the first computer graphics system in Australia. He was the technical support for the computing facilities in the Research Schools at the Australian National University, which gave him excellent access to libraries and scientists there.
 
Wal was initially heavily influenced by the then revolutionary ideas of Immanuel Velikovsky of Princeton. Velikovsky proposed that mankind had been devastated in the past by cosmological events . Wal took these ideas and with his deep knowledge of astronomy and, plasma physics began his own questioning of scientific dogma. Paramount was the place of electro magnetism, as distinct from gravity, in the formation of the universe . This slowly but surely led to his and other colleagues (such as David Talbot, Donald Scott, and Anthony Peratt) questioning such ingrained theories as the big bang, black holes and Einstein’s theory of relativity. This group in particular contend that many scientific “proofs “are theory laden or mathematically concocted. An insistence on empirical data from observations and experiments gives their work true integrity. (bio taken from www.ancientdestructions.com, more at the sight)
 
Wallace's site: www.holoscience.com
 
Thunderbolts: www.thunderbolts.info
 
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Worlds in Collision by Immanuel Velikovsky (1950)

Many years ago I picked up a couple of beat up copies of books by Immanuel Velikovsky at a used book store. I knew the name, but not much else. I figured maybe one day I would read them. Around 2012, I had become very interested in The Electric Universe theory and thunderbolts.info has become a favorite site of mine. They often mention Velikovsky, enough so that I finally sat down and read "Worlds in Collision".

The main gist of Velikovsky's theory is that Venus started life as a comet, and within historical times. It was ejected from Jupiter around 1600 B.C. when a larger mass collided with the gas giant, and it had close encounters with both Earth and Mars before settling into it's current location. Velikovsky was a Russian born psychoanalyst, and a friend and contemporary of Einstein. When this book was published in 1950 it ignited a huge controversy. First of all, he was writing outside of his field. Second, he was contradicting accepted science at the time. Third, he was using ancient texts to support his theory, especially the Bible. None of this sat well with the scientific establishment of the time. It got worse, when various predictions he made, Venus would be hot, not cold as mainstream science believed, for example, turned out to be correct. In fact, the majority of what Velikovsky predicted seems to have been accurate. The attacks on him are astonishing, and have been covered in many other books. Carl Sagan made a special point of trying to take down Velikovsky, and many feel that he was successful. However a clear, unbiased look at what Sagan did, reveals that he actually failed to disprove Immanuel's theory, and that it was more of a hit job than anything else. Back to the book. It is a fascinating read. It was a best seller when it came out, and has held it's own for a long time after. It is well written, and detailed. And, yes, he does take passages from the bible to support his theory. However, he finds equating passages from other parts of the world to substantiate this. If one text says the sun stood still in the sky, he looks for, and finds, other texts from the same time period, from other parts of the world, that say the same thing. He shows that Venus is not mentioned by any cultures prior to a certain point, approximately 1600 B.C. He shows that it flew erratically around the heavens, and was a fearsome thing in the sky. He shows that it had a comet's tail, and was often referred to as comet's were. It is a stunning piece of work. I was pretty blown away when I got done. This book, however, was published in 1950. What I wanted to know was, has anything in our current understanding of science and history been found that soundly defeats Velikovsky's work? It seemed like a massive undertaking.

 

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The Velikovsky Heresies: Worlds in Collision and Ancient Catastrophes Revisited by Laird Scranton (2012)

Velikovsky's "Worlds in Collision" was published in 1950. I had read it for the first time in 2012. I was intrigued, but what I wanted to know was, has anything in our current understanding of science and history been found that soundly defeats Velikovsky's work? It seemed like a massive undertaking. Enter Laird Scranton...

Just about the time I was asking these questions, Laird Scranton published The Velikovsky Heresies, and hey, guess what, it is a book that answers that very question about how the theory has held up. From interviews I have heard with Laird, he went into this book with no bias one way or another. He did the research, took the main parts of Velikovsky's theory and searched to find out whether they stand or fall. For the most part, the theory has been more vindicated than debunked. Of course, when dealing with events of the distant past, it is hard to ever know for certain, but Laird, step by step, takes apart Velikovsky's theory and shows the current science that seems to support it (for example, we now know that Venus seems to still have the remnants of what seems to be a comet's tail!). It is a brilliant piece of work by it's own right, and my only complaint would be that I managed to read through it in about a day. There is a lot packed into the 130+ pages that make up this book, however. No theory is ever completely right, and of course that very much applies to Velikovsky, but Laird shows how much of the theory has held up over the 62 years since it was first published. It is impressive. You can easily read Laird's book without ever reading World's in Collision. I would, however, recommend reading both to get a more complete understanding of a theory that one day may completely change the way we look at our own solar system and planetary origins.

 

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