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Where Did the Road Go?

Andy Colvin on Mothman, John Keel, and the UFO Phenomenon - January 18, 2014

 

 
 
 
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Andy Colvin is our guest as we discuss John Keel and The Mothman. Andy has published some rare writings by Keel, and has also done his own work on The Mothman.
 
Andy Colvin is an eclectic artist, filmmaker, writer, musician, and media commentator who has been called "his generation's Charles Fort," the "Sherlock Holmes of synchro-conspiracy," and "one of America's great, pain-in-the-butt original thinkers." Colvin was one of the founders of the "xerox" or "street art" movement now popular in galleries from London to L.A. Colvin was also one of the first "spoken word" artists, and is considered by some to be the world's foremost authority on the mysterious "Mothman" phenomenon, due to his early experiences with the phenomenon and his intensive audiovisual documentation of symbols and synchronicities.
 
Colvin's often controversial theories have made him a popular speaker on venues like Coast to Coast AM, Ground Zero, NPR, RAI, and PBS, and have gained him a dedicated following. In 2011, Colvin co-hosted the popular conspiracy show, "That Was the Month That Wasn't," which examined how the media blends stories to subconsciously "manufacture consent" in the public mind. Colvin currently co-hosts two wide-ranging internet radio shows, "The Stench of Truth" and "The Church of Mabus," which explore various esoteric topics.
 
Following in the footsteps of Fortean author John A. Keel, Colvin has blazed a 21st Century trail of investigation into mysteries that have affected mankind for centuries, such as UFOs, creature entities, magic, and the psychology of the human mind. Colvin's approach is unique in that it blends a background of genuine paranormal experience with decades of research into political science, history, media behavior, and sociology. His understanding of art and symbology has, at times, allowed Colvin to connect dots that previously escaped attention.
 
In the 1960s, on a West Virginia backroad, Colvin's neighborhood was hit by a series of mysterious phenomena, such as exotic flying craft, Men in Black, and the intriguing entity now known as "Mothman." Following these encounters, Colvin found that he could draw, sing, and take pictures, and that he had a photographic memory. He was recognized as a prodigy, and was eventually offered a scholarship to Harvard University. While in college, Colvin broke ground in several then-new disciplines, such as guerrilla art, performance art, and "shamanic conceptual" art. In the early 1980s, Colvin made a splash in the New York art world by taking on the persona of "Whiz," a practitioner of "collaborative art." This unique approach allowed Colvin to actually work in some manner with several notable artists.
 
While attending graduate school at the Univ. of Texas at Austin, Colvin helped found U.T.'s celebrated Transmedia Dept. as well as the Austin Film Society, an organization now credited with bringing commercial film making to Texas. In 1985, Colvin used his tuition grant money to purchase the only 8mm camcorder then available, becoming the first filmmaker in Austin to shoot in the new format. His ensuing documentation of the lives of local "slackers" influenced the seminal cult hit that defined Generation-X, "Slacker." Colvin's band, "Ed Hall," appeared in the film and on the soundtrack.
 
Following graduate school, Colvin worked on Hollywood films, toured with his experimental troupe, The Interdimensional Vortex League (once named America's "most underground band"), and began making small, ethnographic documentaries about unusual tribes, subcultures, and personalities. His 25-year study of modern Texans, "Multislackers: The Emerging Threat," is slated for production in 2013.
 
Colvin's work has been seen or heard in all 50 states, and in several foreign countries. His writing has appeared in various magazines, including Paranoia, The Stranger, Inside the Grassy Knoll, and D'Art, the arts journal for the Church of the Subgenius. Colvin's unique career has been studded with various mind-blowing, synchronistic events, some of which allowed him to study with, or work with, some of the greatest creative minds of the 20th Century, including Nam June Paik, Dennis Hopper, David Lynch, Robert Anton Wilson, Laurie Anderson, Daniel Johnston, Vito Acconci, Bruce Bickford, Ron English, Frank Kozik, and the Butthole Surfers.
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Keith McCloskey on The Dyatlov Pass Incident - January 25, 2014

 

 
 

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In January 1959, ten experienced young skiers set out for Mount Otorten in the far north of Russia. While one of the skiers fell ill and returned, the remaining nine lost their way and ended up on another mountain slope known as Kholat Syakhl (or 'Mountain of the Dead').
On the night of 1st February 1959 something or someone caused the skiers to flee their tent in such terror that they used knives to slash their way out. Search parties were sent out and their bodies were found, some with massive internal injuries but with no external marks on them. The autopsy stated the violent injuries were caused by 'an unknown compelling force'. The area was sealed off for years by the authorities and the full events of that night remained unexplained.
 
Using original research carried out in Russia and photographs from the skier's cameras, Keith McCloskey attempts to explain what happened to the nine young people who lost their lives in the mysterious 'Dyatlov Pass Incident'. His book is entitled, Mountain of the Dead and we speak to Keith about the details of what happened, what we do know, and the many theories as to what may have happened to them. 
 
Keith's website: www.keithmccloskey.com.
Website for the book: www.dyatlov-pass-incident.com


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Midweek Podcast with Paul Kimball on The Best Evidence for UFO's - January 31, 2014

 

 
 
 
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For this mid-week podcast we welcome back Paul Kimball, and we discuss Roswell, Rendlesham Forest, and various other UFO cases. We discuss what Paul feels are the best cases and why. We also refer to his documentary, which you can watch below. I have to apologize for some of the sound quality. Paul sounds fine, but for some reason, both of my microphones have me sounding like I am talking through a tin can. No idea what happened and nothing much I could do about it. 

Paul Kimball's websites;

Main website: www.beyonderstv.com
Company website: www.redstarfilmtv.com
Roundabout: www.ledacalder.com
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Mike Clelland and Aaron Gulyas on the UFO Enigma - February 1, 2014

 

 
 
 
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So for our first show of Year 2, we have back Aaron Gulyus and Mike Clelland. We will be discuss various facets of the UFO Phenomenon, and this conversation gets pretty deep into the subtlety  of the phenomenon.
 
A teacher, historian, and writer (generally in that order), Gulyas received his BA in History from Hanover College in 1998 and promptly went to work for the state of Indiana assessing disability insurance claims. Wearing out his welcome in the civil service within a year or so, he shifted to the thrilling world of proofreading. Realizing he was only really good at history, he returned to school and was awarded an MA in United States History from Indiana University-Indianapolis in 2003. He then moved into teaching, eventually landing at Mott Community College, where he has taught since 2006.
 
Gulyas's first book, Extraterrestrials and the American Zeitgeist: Contact Tales since the 1950s was published in May 2013 by McFarland Books. His newest book is The Chaos Conundrum, a collection of essays on the paranormal, religion, spirituality, an the atemporal, published by Redstar Books. In Fandom's Shadow, a 50th anniversary retrospective of Doctor Who, Fandom, and its relationship to geography and time, was published in September, 2013 by Deserted Moon Press.
 
He contributed the introduction to Posthuman Blues: Dispatches From a World on the Cusp of Terminal Dissolution, a collection of writings by the late Mac Tonnies edited by Paul Kimball.
 
You can find more by Aaron at his website: www.ajgulyas.com or follow him on Facebook at www.facebook.com/aaronjohngulyas.
 
Mike, in his own words... "I was born in 1962 in the suburbs of Detroit. Even during my pre-kindergarten years I was a skilled illustrator, and most of what I would draw was goofy and cartoony. Curiously, the stuff I would draw in elementary school looks a lot like my drawing style now.
 
I was deeply influenced by MAD magazine, and that is still evident in my work today. I need to thank Mort Drucker, Sergio Aregones and Jack Davis for shaping my style. I also need to thank R. Crumb, who I discovered a little bit later in life.
 
In 1981 I moved to New York City, where I went to NYU Film School for one year. I was all too aware that I was a lousy student, and I dropped out and began working as a free-lance illustrator and art director for advertising agencies.
 
In the winter of 1986/87 I spent the season as a ski bum in Jackson Hole Wyoming. This experience would make it very difficult to fully embrace my urban career when I returned to New York. I eventually moved out west permanently in 1991, and this move paralleled the advent of the fax machine and Federal Express. These revolutionary tools allowed me to do illustration work anywhere I wanted, and I was still dealing with clients back in The City. All of this became much easier with the internet.
 
Once out west I began doing book illustrations and teaching for an outdoor school.
 
It was around 2005 or so when I felt a sort of oppressive need to look into some odd life events, stories and memories that I had denied had any importance. Little by little I realized that I simply could no longer ignore those memories and their implications.
 
The catalyzing event was a profoundly strange synchronicity involving a bottle of sunblock. From that point on, it felt like the floodgates were opened up.
 
Let me also add that the initial years of my self exploration have not been easy. The act of trying to peer into my own unknown life events has been enormously challenging. I became a shaky recluse, locked in a spiraling tape loop of insecurity and self-doubt. Presently, things have been a little less difficult, but it's by no means easy. The act of digging like this is no simple undertaking, it’s been hard work. The truth for me is that I simply have to go down this road, no matter what the consequences. It seems I am being pulled ever forward by some unknown force. This might be my own higher self, or it might be something interacting with me from outside my being, I truly don’t know. What I do know is that this new chapter of my life has been profoundly interesting."
 
You can find Mike's work on his blog; hiddenexperience.blogspot.com. You can also read the long form essay he has on the owl phenomenon here.

 
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